TV and Screen Time: Ideas for Providers and Parents

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January 10, 2013  |  Education, Special Needs  |  Comments Off on TV and Screen Time: Ideas for Providers and Parents  |  Share

Young people spend more time using media . TV, movies, music, computers, Internet, cell phones, magazines, and video games.than engaging in any other single activity except sleep. In addition, DVDs marketed for infants and toddlers imply that they will increase a baby’s vocabulary.

Medical providers can educate families in their practice about what we know about media exposure and how to limit their children’s time in front of a screen. It is especially important to share this information with parents of children with special health care needs. Babies below the age of 2 will not benefit from educational videos. Older children need a balanced approach to screen time. All children, with or without special needs, learn best from interaction, play and conversation, not from television and video. Find out how to introduce and integrate media exposure into your child’s life . . .

Speech Irregularities in Early Childhood

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May 2, 2012  |  Child Health, Disabilities, Early Intervention  |  Comments Off on Speech Irregularities in Early Childhood  |  Share

Distinguishing stuttering from age-typical speech disfluency: Many young children experience speech disfluency, especially during a period of rapid language development. Near the onset of stuttering, parents need to be reassured and given enough information so that they will feel comfortable with a period of monitoring.

We don’t want to tell them to ignore the stuttering, but we do want to reduce the amount of focus and anxiety around the stuttering. Discover what may be helpful for parents before they see a Speech-Language Pathologist. Read more by Margaret Jah, ARNP, in Child Health Notes . . .